April 4, 2011
Some more awesome untranslatable words

Schadenfreude
German – Quite famous for its meaning that somehow other  languages neglected to recognize, this refers to the feeling of pleasure  derived by seeing another’s misfortune.  I guess “America’s Funniest  Moments of Schadenfreude” just didn’t have the same ring to it.
Torschlusspanik
German – Translated literally, this word means  “gate-closing panic,” but its contextual meaning refers to “the fear of  diminishing opportunities as one ages.” (Altalang.com)
Wabi-Sabi
Japanese – Much has been written on this Japanese concept, but in a sentence, one might be able to understand it as “a  way of living that focuses on finding beauty within the imperfections of  life and accepting peacefully the natural cycle of growth and decay.” (Altalang.com)
Dépaysement
French – The feeling that comes from not being in one’s home country.
Tingo
Pascuense (Easter Island) – Hopefully this isn’t a word  you’d need often: “the act of taking objects one desires from the house  of a friend by gradually borrowing all of them.” (Altalang.com)
Hyggelig 
Danish – Its “literal” translation into English gives  connotations of a warm, friendly, cozy demeanor, but it’s unlikely that  these words truly capture the essence of a hyggelig; it’s likely something that must be experienced to be known.  I think of good friends, cold beer, and a warm fire. (Altalang.com)
L’appel du vide
French – “The call of the void” is this French expression’s  literal translation, but more significantly it’s used to describe the  instinctive urge to jump from high places.
Ya’aburnee
Arabic – Both morbid and beautiful at once, this  incantatory word means “You bury me,” a declaration of one’s hope that  they’ll die before another person because of how difficult it would be  to live without them.
Duende
Spanish –  While originally used to describe a mythical,  spritelike entity that possesses humans and creates the feeling of awe  of one’s surroundings in nature, its meaning has transitioned into  referring to “the mysterious power that a work of art has to deeply move  a person.” There’s actually a nightclub in the town of La Linea de la  Concepcion, where I teach, named after this word. (Altalang.com)


letsalllaughattheduck:

Maybe we should invent some new words, and not leave it up to Lil’ Wayne?

Some more awesome untranslatable words
Schadenfreude

German – Quite famous for its meaning that somehow other languages neglected to recognize, this refers to the feeling of pleasure derived by seeing another’s misfortune. I guess “America’s Funniest Moments of Schadenfreude” just didn’t have the same ring to it.

Torschlusspanik

German – Translated literally, this word means “gate-closing panic,” but its contextual meaning refers to “the fear of diminishing opportunities as one ages.” (Altalang.com)

Wabi-Sabi

Japanese – Much has been written on this Japanese concept, but in a sentence, one might be able to understand it as “a way of living that focuses on finding beauty within the imperfections of life and accepting peacefully the natural cycle of growth and decay.” (Altalang.com)

Dépaysement

French – The feeling that comes from not being in one’s home country.

Tingo

Pascuense (Easter Island) – Hopefully this isn’t a word you’d need often: “the act of taking objects one desires from the house of a friend by gradually borrowing all of them.” (Altalang.com)

Hyggelig

Danish – Its “literal” translation into English gives connotations of a warm, friendly, cozy demeanor, but it’s unlikely that these words truly capture the essence of a hyggelig; it’s likely something that must be experienced to be known. I think of good friends, cold beer, and a warm fire. (Altalang.com)

L’appel du vide

French – “The call of the void” is this French expression’s literal translation, but more significantly it’s used to describe the instinctive urge to jump from high places.

Ya’aburnee

Arabic – Both morbid and beautiful at once, this incantatory word means “You bury me,” a declaration of one’s hope that they’ll die before another person because of how difficult it would be to live without them.

Duende

Spanish – While originally used to describe a mythical, spritelike entity that possesses humans and creates the feeling of awe of one’s surroundings in nature, its meaning has transitioned into referring to “the mysterious power that a work of art has to deeply move a person.” There’s actually a nightclub in the town of La Linea de la Concepcion, where I teach, named after this word. (Altalang.com)

letsalllaughattheduck:

Maybe we should invent some new words, and not leave it up to Lil’ Wayne?

(via underthebrightestlights)

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